Scoop! Archives

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Since we're kicking off our Spring 2017 season on QVC with a Sedum and Sempervivum TSV, we thougth we'd dedicate this edition of the Scoop to sharing a few ideas on how to use you're versitile succulents.

Cottage Farms' low-maintenance sedum collections are a beautiful way to complete your outdoor oasis. This largely overlooked living tapestry is an ideal groundcover because it thrives in almost any location, brings you four seasons of color—it's evergreen—it's cold hardy and virtually maintenance free. No green thumb is required.

These lovely plants provide a blanket of green, yellow, white, pink and red blossoms throughout summer—but the beauty doesn't stop there. The evergreen foliage boasts gorgeous green, yellow, pink, purple, blue and red hues in fall, winter, and spring (the sedum collection you purchase will determine the colors you get).

The beautiful colors attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

It's a perennial and it's deer resistant.

Low growing shallow-rooted sedum is the perfect landscape plant to beautify, solve problems, and easily grow in almost any situation.

The mat can be cut and shaped to fit any space or design to plant separately into pots, or space the sections out on the ground and they will spread out to fill in the space between. If cut into 2-inch squares it will provide individual plugs ready for planting that will spread to about 3 times its original width when given room to grow.

Even greater versatility and more applications: sedum is one of the most versatile plants you will find. It works great in sun or shade—it's cold hardy, drought tolerant—it fits great in small spaces and containers—and is ideal for problem areas.

Sedum is perfect for embankments and low traffic slopes, along driveways, garden walls, or pathways and also ideal for under-planting of shrubs or perennials to cut down on mulching and weeds. It works great between the stones of your walkway. The sedum makes an incredible center piece for your outdoor lunch party. Use around your house, deck or patio and along sidewalks to create a beautiful splash of rich color. Sedum works great in unique projects like covering a storage shed roof top, the top of a birdhouse or feeder, the base of a planter or as a door wreath. Prepared correctly, it can easily be turned into hanging wall art.

The uses are only limited by one's imagination.

The easiest planting ever! No digging, just rake the soil to loosen and lay the pieces on the ground. Water periodically the first two weeks and occasionally the first summer until established.



If you haven't gotten your sedum (and sempervivum) from QVC or Cottage Farms—yet—and are starting to want some for your home—click here to see our sedum (and sempervivum) collections.


 

Bluebird House with a Living Sedum Roof


You have a tile of beautiful sedum—what can you do with it?

What can't you do with it? As we listed above, sedum can be used in everything from groundcover to decoration for home projects.

How about a birdhouse for Bluebirds with a living sedum roof? Some of the creative people at Cottage Farms had built Bluebird Houses for their home. Using one of their birdhouses as a template, we decided to put together plans to help anyone who would like to build one.

These Bluebird Houses are beautiful with a natural, unpainted wood (like sedar) and are wonderful additions to the yard when painted and decorated with paint and stencils. Plus, they not only display some of your beautiful sedum (you only use a part of your sedum tile), but also provide a home for Bluebirds (these birdhouses look great with sempervivum growing on them, too).

We've saved the plans as a pdf, so you'll need Adobe Reader (it's free to download) to view the file once you've downloaded them.

Have fun and send us pictures of the beautiful Bluebird House you built with sedum (or sempervivum—or both) growing on top.

Click here to download the Bluebird House with a Living Sedum Roof instructions.
Click here to download Adobe Reader.



Picture Perfect Sedum


Your sedum is so beautiful you just want to frame it and hang it on the wall. So, why not do exactly that?

Phillip recently showed Jill how easy it was to put together a framed sedum box you can hang on your wall. We thought we'd create some simple instructions to show what he demostrated.

Start by building a picture frame or simply use one you buy or already have. If possible, you may want to make sure the frame is made of wood and not particle board or some other material that will not last when exposed to the weather.


Then build a wooden box that is a little wider and longer than the length and width of the frame so that the frame will cover the end of the box. Also, you can make the inside of the box as deep as you'd like, but we recommend making it at least 3 inches deep to allow 2 inches for soil and 1 inch for the sedum to give it more soil to grow in. (Optional) Add a few 1/4 inch diameter holes to each board (sides and back) to allow water to drain no matter how you display the sedum.

Cut a piece of deer netting to cover the top of the box (or use chicken wire or any kind of mesh that will hold the sedum in place while allowing it to grow through).


Fill the box with soil, packing it tightly into the box with your hands. Leave about 1 inch from the top for your sedum.

Shape your sedum to fit the box and lay it over the soil.

Use tacks or staples to secure the four corners of the netting/mesh to the box to keep it in place (you may wish to add a few extra tacks/staples along the end of the box to increase the netting's/mesh's hold).

Nail the picture frame to the front of the box.

As the sedum grows it will create an amazing live tapestry for you to display. Hang it from an outside wall or from your deck. Lean it against a wall either on the floor or patio table. Lay it flat in the center of your table as a beautiful center piece.



Table That Last Project


How about a slight twist to the above project? Use a table instead of the picture frame!

Start by building a table or simply use one you buy or already have.

If you build your table, build it with an opening in the middle. If you purchase a table or use one you already have, cut an area out of the middle of the table (make sure you leave plenty of room around the opening to use the table for putting things on).

Note that your opening doesn't have to be square. You might wish to get creative and make the opening round, star shaped or any other shape you like. When you build your box, it doesn't have to be square either, just make sure the table completely covers the box so that only the inside of the box shows through the opening.

Build a wooden box that is a little wider and longer than the length and width of the opening so that the table will cover the end of the box. Also, you can make the inside of the box as deep as you'd like, but we recommend making it at least 3 inches deep to allow 2 inches for soil and 1 inch for the sedum to give it more soil to grow in. Add a few 1/4 inch diameter holes to the bottom of the box to allow water to drain.

Nail the box to the bottom of the table with its opening up.

Fill the box with soil, packing it tightly into the box with your hands. Leave about 1 inch from the top for your sedum.

Shape your sedum to fit the opening and lay it over the soil.

Plus—this is a great place to add sempervivum! Either work them into the sedum to add flower-like succulents to the decoration or put them in small pots to create a beautiful centerpiece.